Artist type term listing: G (12 terms)

Person who depict scenes of everyday life, such as a domestic interior, rural or village life
Those who do gilding, especially as an occupation.
Generally, painters who create images or decoration on the front or reverse of glass pieces or sheets. Refers particularly to stained glass artists who painted images on the glass, especially the smaller details on windows and panels.
Those who make glass or glassware.
General term for those who work with or on glass or glass objects
Persons whose work is cutting and setting glass, such as window panes. W
People who make or sell gloves.
One who beats out gold metal into thin plates or gold-leaf
Persons who design and create artwork and copy layouts, including both words and images, for presentation by visual media such as books, magazines, newspapers, posters, television and packaging. DOT
Refers to sworn confraternities, brotherhoods, or associations formed for the mutual aid, protection of its members, or for the furtherance of professional interests. In the context of art and related disciplines, it refers to associations of artists, craftsmen, tradesmen, or merchants, which flourished in Europe between the 11th and 16th centuries and formed an important part of the economic and social fabric of this period. Most guilds were associated with a particular town or city. Guilds often monitored training, standards of production, and the welfare of their members. Guilds also provided significant patronage of the arts. Refers to sworn confraternities, brotherhoods, or associations formed for the mutual aid, protection of its members, or for the furtherance of professional interests. In the context of art and related disciplines, it refers to associations of artists, craftsmen, tradesmen, or merchants, which flourished in Europe between the 11th and 16th centuries and formed an important part of the economic and social fabric of this period. Most guilds were associated with a particular town or city. Guilds often monitored training, standards of production, and the welfare of their members. Guilds also provided significant patronage of the arts. Refers to sworn confraternities, brotherhoods, or associations formed for the mutual aid, protection of its members, or for the furtherance of professional interests. In the context of art and related disciplines, it refers to associations of artists, craftsmen, tradesmen, or merchants, which flourished in Europe between the 11th and 16th centuries and formed an important part of the economic and social fabric of this period. Most guilds were associated with a particular town or city. Guilds often monitored training, standards of production, and the welfare of their members. Guilds also provided significant patronage of the arts. Refers to sworn confraternities, brotherhoods, or associations formed for the mutual aid, protection of its members, or for the furtherance of professional interests. In the context of art and related disciplines, it refers to associations of artists, craftsmen, tradesmen, or merchants, which flourished in Europe between the 11th and 16th centuries and formed an important part of the economic and social fabric of this period. Most guilds were associated with a particular town or city. Guilds often monitored training, standards of production, and the welfare of their members. Guilds also provide patronage of the arts